Gift Shops

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Remember your experience of Indigenous land, people, and culture and support Indigenous artists and business owners. Ensure your souvenir contributes to the livelihood of Indigenous artists by shopping at Indigenous-owned gift shops, where education and respect are priorities. Respectful relationships with expert carvers, jewellers, and painters allow shop owners to provide cultural and contextual knowledge to the public about traditional and modern Indigenous art.

Experience Providers

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Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre

museums & heritage sites, attractions, art galleries, indigenous culture, shopping

museums & heritage sites, attractions, art galleries, indigenous culture, shopping

The Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre is a three-story, 30,400-square foot award-winning cultural centre designed to blend the traditional Squamish Longhouse with the Lil'wat Istken. Cultural Ambassadors share their knowledge and stories with guests, augmenting the information shared throughout the centre's curated collection of artifacts and contemporary pieces. Traditional drum songs are shared at the top of each hour. The facility is designed to evoke a traditional Squamish longhouse and a Lil'wat Istken (pit house) and is surrounded by dramatic mountain scenery. This thriving cultural centre shares meaningful experiences, educating all, and lifts their two distinct cultures.

Vancouver Coast & Mountains

Whistler

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Cheryl's Trading Post

shopping, indigenous culture, art galleries

shopping, indigenous culture, art galleries

Authentic hand made Native Art, hand carved cedar wall panels, Native jewelry, Authentic Cowichans, Dreamcatchers, and a wide selection of clothing. A variety of Native Art from across the Americas Turtle Island.

Vancouver Coast & Mountains

Surrey

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Haida House at Tllaal

hotels, indigenous culture, shopping, sightseeing

hotels, indigenous culture, shopping, sightseeing

Nestled along the banks of the serene Tlell River, surrounded by ancient forest and open sky, youll find the Haida House at Tllaal - a classic 10-room lodge. With its timeless and cozy log aesthetic, this is the perfect home base from which to start off on your Haida Gwaii adventure. The nightly rate structure is ideal for those who wish to self-explore the many eco-adventures, natural attractions and historical and cultural sites found on Haida Gwaiis Graham and Moresby Islands. Gift shop and conference facilities on-site. Designed to blend harmoniously with the landscape and honour traditional Haida architecture, youll fall in love with our 12 new two-bedroom cedar cabins. Boasting a choice of dune, ocean, and forest views, each features a minibar kitchen and great room with fireplace, flatscreen TV, covered hot tub and outdoor shower. Enjoy a bed and breakfast cabin stay, or as part of a 3, 4 or 7-night all-inclusive package.

Northern British Columbia

Tlell

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Gift 'N Gab Trading Post

indigenous culture, shopping

indigenous culture, shopping

Thompson Okanagan

Barriere

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U'mista Cultural Centre

indigenous culture, museums & heritage sites, shopping

indigenous culture, museums & heritage sites, shopping

U'mista Cultural Centre is one of the longest-operating and most successful First Nations cultural facilities in BC, founded in 1980 as a ground breaking project to house potlatch artifacts which had been seized by government during an earlier period of cultural repression. The return of the potlatch artifacts not only provided U'mista's name ('the return of something important'), and sparked a general trend toward repatriation of First Nations and cultural artifacts, it caused the creation of a physical facility and human resources infrastructure which have been successfully operated for over two decades.U'mista now operates a modern museum and cultural education facility in Alert Bay. Their operations include the museum, an extensive art gallery and gift shop, group tours, and presentations by dance troupes.

Vancouver Island

Alert Bay

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Skwachays Lodge

indigenous culture, hotels, art galleries, shopping

indigenous culture, hotels, art galleries, shopping

VNHS opened Skwachys Lodge, the Urban Indigenous Fair-Trade Gallery, and the Artists in Residence Program in June of 2012. The former Pender Hotel was transformed from a three-and-a-half-story derelict SRO hotel to a unique Indigenous social enterprise that combines a boutique hotel with a street-level art gallery, that supports on-site housing and studio space for 24 Indigenous artists. VNHS identified the vulnerability of many urban Indigenous artists artists in need of housing, artists who for various reasons are not able to properly represent and market themselves or their work. Often these artists are commercially exploited through a long established street or underground market that takes advantage of their vulnerability. They try to live off their work by selling on the street or in the bars or through the commercial dealer network that purchases original, gallery quality art for, at times, only five or ten cents on the dollar. By creating a live/work supportive complex with a built-in gallery and community production space, VNHS took a lead role in addressing the social and economic inequities that Indigenous artists can face. The Artists in Residence Program is a unique and life-changing housing program for practicing Indigenous artists. The program includes very affordable housing in clean, unfurnished bachelor suites, 24/7 access to shared artist workshops, and participation in programming opportunities for personal and professional development that help artists develop their craft and move into the next phase of their careers. A 3-year residency in the program is dependent on successful program participation and the achievement of self-defined career goals. Emerging, mid-career, and senior artists are welcome to apply. To date we have had over 110 Indigenous artists complete the program. The Lodge, the Urban Indigenous Fair-Trade Gallery and production space are operated as a self-sustaining social enterprise. Artists are paid a fair price for their work. The model follows the established practices found in the art world. Generally an artist receives between 30%-60% of the retail price depending on the artists reputation and the cost that is underwritten by the gallery (framing, marketing and promotional expenses.) In short, when a guest spends their overnight travel dollars at the Skwachys Lodge there is a social impact people are housed. When a guest, a member of the community or a company purchases authentic Indigenous art at the Fair Trade Gallery, there is a social impact a simple purchase fights cultural misappropriation and ensures that Indigenous artists are paid fairly for their work. Cultural tourism is one of the fastest growing segments of the tourism sector and there is absolutely a place for our urban Indigenous artists to participate in this industry as a means of reclaiming their lives and independence.

Vancouver Coast & Mountains

Vancouver

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